Why Respect?



“A nation that hates politics will not long survive as a democracy.”

E.J. Dionne

Our political system is broken and the key to fixing it is respect.

Today, despite honest efforts by politicians across the ideological spectrum, our polarized government is structurally incapable of moving society forward. Facing a troubled economy, military overreach, and an ever-growing disparity of wealth, we've never needed a progressive movement more. Instead, an aggressive us-versus-them mentality has taken hold of both our dominant political parties. That aggression—that disrespect—has brought our state to the point of financial insolvency; allowed us to muddle through educational and economic policy; forced us to mortgage the future of our state; and caused us to see Minnesotans who are ideologically different from ourselves as impediments to, rather than partners in, progress.

Respect is essential in two ways.

First, my approach to key political issues that affect our community will be defined by respect for all people, regardless of color, age, sexual orientation, faith, language, gender, income. Respect means I strongly believe in high-quality health care for all people. Respect means I support marriage between any two people who love each other. Respect means all of our students, whatever their skin color, language or learning needs, deserve the resources they need to learn and grow. These issues are important to this community because we know that all people deserve respect.

Second, treating others with respect is the best way to break the gridlock in this state—it's how we can make real progress. By showing respect for all, I will work with all for the betterment of South Minneapolis. I will build relationships with other legislators, regardless of ideology. I will visit their districts to learn what they need, and they will visit ours to learn our concerns. I will never judge another person based on the party they represent, because we all represent Minnesota.

The voices of this community are as diverse as the many languages we speak. Together, we will move forward.

 


 

On December 6th, Susan Allen, the DFL-endorsed candidate, won the 61B primary election. She and I will compete in the general election on Tuesday, January 10th, 2012. Please be sure to visit her website to learn more about her experience and positions on the issues.

 


 

Watch a video of the second candidates' forum with Susan Allen and Nathan Blumenshine!

January 4th, 2012 - Powderhorn Park Neighborhood



Jump to clips of specific issues!

OPENING STATEMENTS PHOTO ID REQUIREMENT TO VOTE
BUDGETS UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE
GRASSROOTS ISSUES COMMUNICATING WITH CONSTITUENTS
FORECLOSURE RIGHT TO WORK
CHILD CARE UNIONIZATION NATIVE AMERICAN ISSUES
VIKINGS STADIUM JOBS
TORTURE CANDIDATES DIFFERENCES
CLOSING STATEMENTS

This debate was sponsored by the Powderhorn Park Neighborhood Association and the League of Women Voters.